Jogging and Running

During jogging or running, 26 bones, 33 joints, 112 ligaments, and a network of tendons, nerves, and blood vessels all work together. Experts say jogging requires a slow and steady approach. Proper pacing, shoes, and stretching routines are a must.

Avoid using just any pair of sneakers lying around the house, however. And if you are overweight, you might consider a less strenuous but beneficial activity such as bicycling or swimming.

Some experts advise alternating your regime between walking and jogging. Plan a regular routine and stick with it. If you are an active and regular runner or jogger, we can check for any potential stress on your lower extremities.

Avoiding Injuries and Pain

Debilitating muscle strain or more serious injury often result when runners or joggers don’t slowly evolve their routine from slow to vigorous. A four-day-per-week conditioning program for 12-16 weeks is generally a good program to follow.

You can also prevent injuries by using proper foot hygiene. Keep your feet powdered and dry. This helps prevent blisters.

If you develop recurring and increasing aches and pains from jogging, discontinue and contact our office.

The most common injuries associated with jogging and running are:

  • Runner’s knee. This is a common term for knee pain. Excessive pronation, or rolling in and down, of the foot, is often the culprit. We may recommend orthoses (arch supports or shoe inserts) to alleviate the problem.
  • Shin splints. These are painful, and occur in the front and inside of the leg. Shin splints are caused by running on hard surfaces or overdoing your stride. Try changing your running technique or use an orthotic device.